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Hi! 

thank you for stopping by rénové. hope you'll browse around a bit and be inspired. xxx

for julia.

for julia.

Maybe drop-leaf tables were actually invented for "San Francisco-sized" kitchens.

But, even if they weren't, they seem to make the perfect fit.

When my friend made mention of her need for a "breakfast nook-alike" table for her adorable studio in Nob Hill, I went straight on the hunt for a drop leaf.

As soon as I got my hands on this one, I immediately knew I wanted to sand the top down. I wanted to get to the layer beneath the varnish, spots, & stains, so that I could see the kind of wood this table was really made of.

I decided to keep the base simple with 2 coats of "Old White" & "Pure White" chalk paint on the base. However, once the top was stripped down, I wanted to enhance the original wood by doing a light 'white wash' technique with the remainder of the paint I had leftover. [My "white wash" was made by adding 2-3 parts water to my leftover paint]

After my boyfriend and I had whitewashed the top, I left the piece incomplete over at his apartment, only to wake up to a surprise text message the next morning, with a note that read..

"I finished the table! Ain't no thang but a chicken wang"

Ray finalized the table with a coat of Annie Sloan's "Dark Wax" & the result was fantastic. I was thrilled. The dark wax really made the texture of the original wood come to life. 

I had two, simple bistro chairs to add to the mix [which I re-painted & re-upholstered]

& wah-lah

A complete dining set ready for a feastin'. 

Thank you Julia for commissioning me over our conversation at this beautiful table. Now I hope you get to enjoy having a table to set up beautifully for your own! 

work with your hands. work with your heart. xxx


for jill.

for jill.

for ray.

for ray.

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